Endi Bogue Hartigan

Selected Works

BOOKS
Released by Omnidawn Publishing in April, 2014, Selected by Cole Swensen for the Omnidawn Open Poetry prize, and a finalist for the 2015 Oregon Book Award.
Selected for the 2008 Colorado Prize for Poetry, and a finalist for the 2009 Oregon Book Award.
COLLABORATIONS
out of the flowering ribs chapbook,
artist-writer collaborations 2011-2013
ONLINE WORK

Welcome

Endi Bogue Hartigan is author of two books of poetry, Pool [5 choruses] (2014, Omnidawn Publishing), and One Sun Storm (2008, Center for Literary Publishing, Colorado State University), as well as poems in journals, chapbooks, and anthologies, collaborative work, and more. For more info, see the biography page.

NEW WORK AND UPDATES

I have a selection of clock poems, part of a manuscript in progress, included in the the luscious new VOLT magazine, issue 22. Gratitude. VOLT is one of my favorite journals and these are in amazing company.

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Honored to have been part of the collaborative project "The Vote", the first collaborative projected curated by PURR (Poets United to Read Rouse Resist) in March of 2017. Read about the project on Facebook here.

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So delighted to be have been part of "Word and Sound," an amazing night of poetry and music performances by women artists at Beacon Sound in February, 2017.

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Thank you thank you Playa! In fall 2016 I spent a two-week residency at Playa writing in this beautiful high desert retreat among other writers, artists, and scientists. I'm so grateful for this focused time on my manuscript. It's moving along.

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This poem "Post reef pre-incanted" was featured in May on the Dusie blog and listserve, poem #164 in the Tuesday poem series!

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Multnomah County Library posted a podcast of this fun reading I participated in during National Poetry Month:
April 30, 2016 reading of Portland Poets Carl Adamshick, Emily Kendal Frey, Endi Bogue Hartigan, Dao Strom


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Honored to have a poem--"Everything that is not a goldfish"-- in the new issue of Denver Quarterly, Volume 50, No. 2.

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Thanks to Kent Shaw at The Rumpus for this review of Pool [5 choruses] , where he talks about sonic "sense-making" in the poems and delves into questions such a "What is the conceptual center of togetherness and chorus and “all” and collective?"and "What about a collective modeled from a field of poppies? Could all those poppies, all the activities among poppies, a woman on a horse riding through, people walking through, the look of other poppies up against the poppies that are further out, fit into the figure you call “poppies” or should it be “field of poppies”? How many poppies?"

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A couple new poems in the spring 2015 magazine Picture Sentence, a journal focused on dialogue in the arts in the Pacific Northwest.

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Thanks to Jacket 2 for publishing this interview on Pool [5 choruses] and more: 'Iterations and interstices: Endi Bogue Hartigan on fields and crowds and more,' conducted by Eliza Rotterman. And many thanks to Eliza Rotterman for this conversation.

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Literary Arts has posted perceptive comments from the judge of this year's Oregon Book Award for poetry, Brenda Shaughnessy, including comments on the winning book, Sorrow Arrow by Emily Kendal Frey, and the finalists: Still Life with Judas and Lightening by Dawn Diez Willis, Turn by Amy Chin-Tanner, The Book of Joshua by Zachary Schomburgy, and my own Pool [5 Choruses] . Here is an excerpt of Brenda's comments about Pool :

"Something between an opera and an ancient yet intergalactic storytelling hour at the sensation-loving intelligentsia’s village tavern, with several versions of everything since why not? This poet is capable of it, after all. Each phrase is a startle, a buzz, a deepening, or a smooth, but what is the accumulation of such disparate magics? Nothing less than jaw-dropping beauty, in choruses, pooled into a body of water/​writing that always contests its own boundaries,...."

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One of my favorite creative experiences recently: performing with artists Dawn Stoppiello (dance) and Ajna Lichau (video/​mixed media) through the Pure Surface series in May, 2015 in a world of vertical gardens, word/​flower clusters, inter-splicing clocks.

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I'm enthralled with this new anthology February , published this spring, and happy to have a poem included in great company. The book gathers poems written by 57 contemporary poets over the month of February 2015.

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I'm happy to have several poems appear in this new anthology Make It True: Poetry of Cascadia, published by Leaf Press. The anthology is a collection of innovative poets of Cascadia, defined as "the bioregion which stretches from Cape Mendocino in the south to Mt. St. Elias, Alaska, to the north and to the Rocky Mountains in the east."

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Hey, I have a few poems up in the new Ostrich Review from a new series.

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Many thanks to Rob McLennan for this recent interview of 20 questions on writing and living with writing.

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Thank you to Emily Vogel at Thethe Poetry for her recent review of Pool:
"We must be made slightly uncomfortable by endless possibilities before we can begin to discover them and accept the invitation to play, among the poppies and the slippage, where meanings are found, erased, revised, disintegrated, and elucidated once again not in their layering, but rather between the layers. Hartigan’s collection is a must read, if not only for its portrayals of beauty, then for its success in satisfying the thirst of the intellect."

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Publisher's Weekly has reviewed Pool among their May poetry reviews:
"Divided into five choruses, the work is troubled by and troubles the notion of a chorus as the many and the one, a laboratory in which individual identity is obliterated and redefined. As Hartigan's muscular poems wrestle with interchangeability, so too do their innovative structures challenge its boundaries. Acrobatic and playful, the poems turn back and reflect on themselves, daring readers to consider intention and arbitrariness at once. And yet, the book is wary of the total annihilation of individual meaning: "The slippage that we must avoid is a certain blanketing in which/​ the delicacy of perception is lost." Hartigan's poems take simultaneity and expose it ."

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Rob McLennan wrote a thoughtful review in The Small Press Book Review.
"What appeals most about these poems is how much manages to happen in such a small sequence of moments, moving one to the next to the next, each one sending ripples that continue for miles. Where Hartigan shines is in the lyric disjunction, composing poems that work to explore the seriousness of real events and the weight of how the world sometimes happens to be, all while managing a lightness of line and a spark of phrasing that bounces."

* The Conversant has included an interview in which I talk about this book with Omnidawn editor Rusty Morrison.



OUT OF THE FLOWERING RIBS

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